A commitment to sustainability

Can we add luxury to the five senses?

From the delicious softness of silk grazing the skin to the crisp feeling of pure cotton on a sunny day and the warmth of wool in Autumn. Natural fibers feel better against the skin and react more easily to the earth's elements.

At Primrose & Wilde we design with natural fabrics. Our first inclination to work with natural fabrics is quality – but the very veins of “quality” run deep and, like you, we share a commitment to quality of life, our planet and sustainability.

It's no small feat to consider your choices, to see the lasting impact of your decisions but it's a matter of integrity.

Save your energy

What do we know about the life of fabric? Natural fibers grow – either animal or plant – and require less energy and chemicals to turn them into fabric. At the end of the day natural fibers will also decompose faster.

Technological advances in fabric development have changed the way we dress and how we care for our clothes. But are we thinking carefully about these choices?

We know that 60% of the body lotions and chemical products that we put on our skin is absorbed into the bloodstream, which leads us to ponder...if it requires numerous chemicals and solvents to create any type of synthetic fabric, (synthetic fabrics are created by a process called polymerization, where chemically-derived fibers are joined together to create fabric) if clothes are created by chemical processes and then we get dressed and ... what percentage of these chemical will our skin absorb?

Here are some of the chemicals utilized in the production of synthetic fabric:

  1. Polyester is made from synthetic polymers that are produced from esters of dihydric alcohol and terpthalic acid.
  2. Acrylic fabrics are polycrylonitriles. The EPA suggest that these may cause cancer.
  3. Rayon is recycled wood pulp. It is treated with chemicals such as caustic soda, ammonia, acetone and sulphuric acid to survive regular washing and wearing.
  4. Acetate and Triacetate are made from wood fibers called cellulose and undergo extensive chemical processing to produce the finished product.
  5. Nylon is made from petroleum and is often given a permanent chemical finish that can be harmful.
  6. Anything static resistant, stain resistant, permanent press, wrinkle-free, stain proof or moth repellant. Many of the stain resistant and wrinkle-free fabrics are treated with perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs), like Teflon.

Source

We believe it is the responsibility of the producers to provide fashion that is healthy, responsible and sustainable. Join us on the path to a better world.

What to wear to a video-conference

Our recommendations for Tere Stouffer. Primrose & Wilde Classic Silk Shirt and Skinny Scarf teamed up with a pair of dark jeans and designer sandals.

Our recommendations for Tere Stouffer. Primrose & Wilde Classic Silk Shirt and Skinny Scarf teamed up with a pair of dark jeans and designer sandals.

The new economy is digital, independent, entrepreneurial.

As many of us operate globally and interact remotely with our clients, partners or vendors we spend increasing amounts of time on the phone or in video conference rather than face-to-face. This obviously changes the balance of how we present ourselves visually and verbally, so we turned to digital marketing expert Tere Stouffer to find out more about how to present yourself in a video conference and how to dress to meet clients. Of course, Tere is bursting with ideas and gave us far more insights into business, dress and digital marketing than we had bargained for.

Who is Tere Stouffer?

Born an engineer, raised in publishing and emerging as a tour de force in digital marketing, Tere has carved out an enviable career, breaking gender barriers, winning prestigious awards and earning a reputation as a leader in her field, all while maintaining a beautiful work-life balance, flying across country to meet clients, running her digital marketing business from her home office and spending quality time with her dog.

Creating Success

Tere's success reads like a text-book of good moves, but is a story of hard work, long hours and a dedication to excellence. Starting her ground-breaking reputation in 1990 Tere was hired as an engineer at Alps (the company behind Alpine) a company with over 10,000 employees as the first female engineer that they had ever employed. 

After a leap into publishing,  she found herselfhired to oversee the publishing of new materials for Girl Scouts of the USA which evolved into a position as Digital Content Strategist and the brand began to flourish at a tremendous rate. After her work being selected as the “Overall Grand Champion” of the inaugural Global Social Media Leadership Awards run by the Wharton School of Business and Ernst & Young, Tere realized that she was really doing something right and a few months later she set out as an entrepreneur.

Do you think this is representative of a new economy?

Yes. The contract economy is a thing and it is here. It is a good fit for me I get to combine all the things I love and this is more and more how people want to be running their lives. But it is not a good fit for everyone. I think it is a younger generation who are less afraid of a life without security, but see the gains of flexibility and the opportunity to define yourself in a new way. As a GenXer, I see Millennials chaffing at job titles that do not adequately define them – they don't want to be pigeon-holed, we are multi-faceted as humans and we want our work-lives to fit in with who we are, rather than fit in with a job title. The contract economy allows all of us to piece together a career that fits fits all those facets.

As an entrepreneur how do you interact with most of your clients?

I try to fly out to meet them in the beginning to put faces to names. After that, we use phone, email and video-conferencing.

How do you dress for a video-conference?

For the most part, I can get away with jeans or a fun skirt, a jacket and nice jewelry. But my clients work in a great range of industries and I need to be cognizant of what is appropriate. When I fly to meet a client I now call and ask “how do you dress there” and pack accordingly. Image and perceptions are very important, but not always in the way you may think.

What do you mean by 'how you may think?'

When I was working at Alpine, I went for an interview at a competing company. I had an interview with the CEO and thought I had nailed it. I looked the consummate professional in a suit, silk shirt, I projected well and had great answers to all the questions.

At the end of the interview, the CEO told me, 'Well this has been one of the most enjoyable hours that I have spent. You are an excellent candidate but...you haven't got the job. I was astounded, but decided to take the opportunity to find out why. He told me “your fingernails aren't dirty. I just don't see you working on the manufacturing floor here, you're too clean” and I realized that I had dressed very professionally, but for the wrong job – he wanted to see how I would fit in with his employees, so if I gone straight from my current position in a greasy work smock I would have appealed as more suitable for the tasks ahead.

How do you suggest dressing appropriately?

Call and ask.  I learned that as much as under-doing it, you do not want to over-dress either. In this entrepreneurial economy you want to fit in and stand out, but every company and industry has its own culture and you want to be aware of that before you approach them for a first meeting. First impressions really do count.

Coming soon...Tere Stouffer's digital marketing strategy advice to small businesses